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The “PALgroups Podcast” is focused on college study review groups.  PAL is the name for the study review groups used at the University of Minnesota.  We drew upon best practices from international models such as Supplemental Instruction, Peer-led Team Learning, and the Emerging Scholars Program. I served on the team that created the PAL model at the Univ. of Minnesota. Before UMN, I served at the Center for SI at the Univ. of Missouri-KC. 
 
Some episodes share new things I am learning from around the world. Common names for peer learning groups are Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) and Peer Assisted Learning (PAL). Other podcast episodes feature student study group leaders and program coordinators describing session activities that worked well. Those interviews include what they are learning personally and professionally from their experience. Send an email to David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu, if you or your students would like to be interviewed for the podcast.  I also maintain an annotated bibliography of publications about seven major peer learning models.  It now exceeds 1,600 publication.  Click this link to download the bibliography.  Training manuals and other PAL resources are available by clicking on this link for the website.

 

The following links allow you to subscribe: iTunes and Apple Podcast, Amazon Music/Audible, Castbox.fm, Deezer, Facebook, Gaana, Google Podcast, iHeartRadio, Player.fm, Radio Public, Samsung Listen, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, Twitter, Vurbl, and YouTube. Automatically available through these podcast apps: AntennaPod, BeyondPod, Blubrry, Castamatic, Castaway 2, Castbox, Castro, iCatcher, Downcast, DoubleTwist, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Podcast Republic, Podcatcher, RSSRadio, and more.

Please post comments to the individual episodes, post to the iTunes podcast review and rating section, and email to me at arendale@umn.edu You can also check out my other four podcasts and social media channels at www.davidmedia.org Thanks for listening.

Nov 29, 2021

(Bonus) Organic chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies the structure, properties and reactions of organic compounds, which contain carbon in covalent bonding.  Study of structure determines their structural formula. Study of properties includes physical and chemical properties, and evaluation of chemical reactivity to understand their behavior. The study of organic reactions includes the chemical synthesis of natural products, drugs, and polymers, and study of individual organic molecules in the laboratory and via theoretical (in silico) study. The range of chemicals studied in organic chemistry includes hydrocarbons (compounds containing only carbon and hydrogen) as well as compounds based on carbon, but also containing other elements, especially oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus (included in many biochemicals) and halogens. Organometallic chemistry is the study of compounds containing carbon–metal bonds. In addition, contemporary research focuses on organic chemistry involving other organometallics including the lanthanides, but especially the transition metals zinc, copper, palladium, nickel, cobalt, titanium and chromium. Organic compounds form the basis of all earthly life and constitute the majority of known chemicals. The bonding patterns of carbon, with its valence of four—formal single, double, and triple bonds, plus structures with delocalized electrons—make the array of organic compounds structurally diverse, and their range of applications enormous. They form the basis of, or are constituents of, many commercial products including pharmaceuticals; petrochemicals and agrichemicals, and products made from them including lubricants, solvents; plastics; fuels and explosives. The study of organic chemistry overlaps organometallic chemistry and biochemistry, but also with medicinal chemistry, polymer chemistry, and materials science.